UF-CTA Affiliated Faculty:


Jonathan H. Crane

Title and department: Prof. and Tropical Fruit Crops Specialist

Address: Tropical Research and Education Center
18905 S.W. 280 Street
Homestead, FL 33031-3314

Phone: 305-246-7001 x.290
E-mail:  jhcr@ufl.edu
Homepage:  http://crane.ifas.ufl.edu

Education:

B.S. - Oregon State University - Horticultural Science B.S. 1981
M.S. - University of Florida - Horticultural Science M.S. 1984
Ph.D.  – University of Florida - Horticultural Science  Ph.D. (Soil Microbiology, minor) 1987

Research Interests (with focus on Tropical Agriculture)
  1. Tropical fruit crop production management systems.
  2. Pruning strategies and systems for tropical fruit crops.
  3. Applied plant stress physiology research.
  4. Development of irrigation and nutrition management systems for tropical fruit crops.
  5. Papaya and carambola cultivar development.

 

Book chapters
  • Crane, J.H.  2007.  The araca pomba, bael fruit, Brazil nut, canistel, cateley guava, green sapote, laevis, loquat, lucuma, mamey sapote, mango, palillo, paradise nut, star apple, ucuqui, white wapote, and vitellaria.  In:  Encyclopedia of Fruit and Nuts, by J. Janick and R.E. Paull.  CABI, Wallingford, United Kingdom. (in press).
  • Newett, S.D.E., J.H. Crane and C.F. Balerdi.  2002.  Cultivars and rootstocks.  In: A.W. Whiley, B. Schaffer, and B.N. Wolstenholme (eds.).  The avocado: botany, production, and uses.  CAB International Press, Wallingford, U.K. P.161-187.
  • Crane, J.H., I.S.E. Bally, R.V. Mosqueda-Vazquez, and E. Tomer.  1997.  Crop production.  In: The Mango.   R.E. Litz (ed.).   CAB International, Wallingford, UK.  P.203-256.
  • Schaffer, B., A.W. Whiley, and J.H. Crane.  1994.  Mango.  In: Handbook of Environmental Physiology of Fruit Crops, Vol. 2, Subtropical and Tropical Crops.  CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida.  P.165-197.
Selected refereed publication
  • Schaffer, B., F.S. Davies, and J.H. Crane.  2006.  Responses of subtropical and tropical fruit trees to flooding in calcareous soil.  HortScience 41:549-555.
Grants (selected from the last 5 years)
  • Crane, J.H.  2006-2007. Southern region program to clear pest control agents for tropical fruit crops.  USDA/SCRS/IR4.  ($58,500).
  • Davis, M., Y. Zhentu, and J. Crane.  2003-2006. Development of transgenic resistance to ringspot virus in papaya for the Caribbean region. USDA T-STAR Caribbean Region.  ($106,614).
  • Sargent, S., D.J. Huber, J.A. Bartz, and J.H. Crane.  2004-2006. Development of integrated procedures for commercial handling of high-quality, exotic fruits and vegetables in the Caribbean Region.  USDA T-STAR Caribbean Region. ($56,546).
  • Schaffer, B., Y. Li, J. Crane, and E. Evans.  2006-2008. Foliar acid applications to prevent iron deficiency in tropical fruit crops grown in calcareous soils.  CSREES-USDA Special Research Grants. ($117,749).
  • Peña, J. and J. Crane. 2006-2007. Lychee, longan and guava grove survey for the fig fruit fig fruit fly (Zaprionus indianus). Tropical Fruit Growers of South Florida. ($10,000).
  • Peña, J., J. Crane, and A. Mayfield.  2006-2007. Preliminary determination of the host status of avocado trees to the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus). Avodado Administrative Committee ($990).
  • Crane, J.H. A.J. Palmateer, and E.A. Evans.  2006-2007. Demonstration of floiarly applied phosphorus acid on phytophthora (Phytophthroa cinnamomi) root rot of avocado. Biopesticide Research Program, IR-4, US-EPA. ($4,591).
  • Migliaccio, K.W., J.H. Crane, Y. Li, E. Evans, B. Schaffer, R. Muñoz-Carpena.  2005-2007. Improving water quality at the watershed level by targeting high-return stakeholders.  USDA-CREES ($238,000).
Teaching Interests (with focus on Tropical Agriculture)

HOS5555 Tropical Fruit Production and Research is offered every even numbered year.  I offer classroom and field instruction on the latest tropical fruit crop horticultural practices to graduate and qualified undergraduate students and industry people.  I continuously develop and update the information on the physiology of tropical fruit crops to the environment, to physiological stresses imposed by the environment, and to horticultural practices.  Our goals are to impart to the students the importance of knowledge of the ecological and climatic aspects of the indigenous habitat of the fruit crops under study; provide students with the concepts, understanding, flexibility, and approaches to creatively investigate and solve horticultural production problems in the field and; to introduce students to new and/or different crops and approaches to tropical fruit culture by offering lectures from TREC faculty and local experts.  We have further internationalized the course by offering guest lectures from fruit authorities from other countries.

Extension/Outreach Interests (with focus on Tropical Agriculture)

I have four broad extension programs with a focus on tropical and subtropical fruit production.  These include:

  • Tropical fruit crops management in Florida.  I cover all aspects of production.  Primary clientele:  Novice and experienced commercial producers, packers/shippers, processors, agricultural suppliers, agricultural organizations, and urban residents.
  • Organizing producers.  Assist producers organize for their mutual benefit and the establishment and use of field extension/research demonstrations.  I facilitate grower groups organize for their mutual benefit.  Primary clientele:  Producers of "minor" commercial tropical fruit crops such as carambola, atemoya, sugar apple, lychee, longan, mamey sapote, passion fruit, and guava.
  • Inter-regional Program No. 4 (IR-4) Field Station.  I head the local IR-4 Center and conduct field trials to collect residue samples (fruit) for residue testing.  The goal is the registration of a pest control product on tropical fruit crops.  Primary clientele:  Commercial producers, pesticide regulators (EPA, DER), and pesticide manufacturers.
  • In-Service Training.  Training of University of Florida Cooperative Extension Agents.  I offer training to University of Florida extension agents and master gardeners.  Primary clientele:  County Cooperative Extension Faculty with responsibility for tropical fruit crops.

Countries where I have consulted include Belize, Ecuador, Egypt, Guatemala, Jamaica, Peru, and Puerto Rico.  Countries visited include the Brazil, China, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guam, Guyana, Honduras, Israel, Mexico, Malaysia, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad-Tobago, and Venezuela. 

International Activities (with focus on Tropical Agriculture)

I have also offered workshops at the invitation of various institutions including the  Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) and Florida International Volunteer Crops for Caribbean Action (Kingston, Jamaica); IICA, (Port of Spain, Trinidad-Tobago); Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas: UNACH), Facultad de Ciencias Agricolas (Chiapas, Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Invcestigaciones Forestales, Agrícolas y Pecuarias (Colima, Mexico); and USAID/Egypt’s Agricultural Technology Utilization and Transfer Project, (Cairo, Egypt).  In addition, I have been an invited speaker or participant/presenter at numerous international conferences on tropical fruits (China, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Honduras, Israel, Jamaica, Mexico, Malaysia, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad-Tobago, and Venezuela). 

 

 

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